5 Important Benefits of Science for Young Learners

Science helps young children not only learn about the world around them, but also develop essential social skills.  Here are some of the benefits of science education for young learners:


1. Science keeps students engaged

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Many students struggle with the structure of a traditional classroom setting, they get antsy.  When students are given a science topic to explore or an experiment to conduct, they have an opportunity to be actively engaged in the learning process.  This can keep them more focused on the lesson and result in less disruptive behavior.


2. Science promotes cooperation and sharing of ideas

Whether students work alone and share results of an experiment afterward or work collaboratively, science promotes sharing.  Learning at a young age how to share your own ideas and listen to those that may differ from yours are essential life skills.  Advances in all fields, including science, are the result of shared input and effort.


3. Science helps students understand that there is a process behind changes they witness in their everyday lives. 

Why are the leaves changing color?  Why does cereal get soggy in milk?  Why did the power go out?  These things are all the result of a scientific process.  Hands-on applications help students connect science to their daily lives.


4. Science allows students to explore and work at their own pace. 

Every class has students with a range of abilities.  When a teacher presents a science experiment, students can then work at a pace that is comfortable for them, which helps meet the developmental needs of the individual learners.  It also gives them an opportunity to get creative with what and how they are testing, which can lead to quality wrap-up discussions.


5. Science is a great way to incorporate math and reading. 

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For example, students are going to be experimenting with plants and sunlight.  The experiment can begin introduced with a non-fiction book about plants.  Over the course of the experiment, students can record plant growth and number of sunny days on a simple bar chart.